5 IT Security Trends from RSA 2014

Posted by Tobias Eichenseer Fri, 07 Mar 2014 12:39:00 GMT

As a gold sponsor of RSA 2014, the HOB team was fortunate to be at the epicenter of all things IT security. Not only were we able to showcase our own contributions to the industry, RSA was an opportunity for us to join the conversation of IT security experts discussing trends and debating the future of the industry. 

As part of our RSA recap, we’d like to share 5 trends we observed during the conference:

  • Although an atmosphere created by the exposure of NSA activity, and its subsequent fall-out, is to be expected at any IT security conference, this was especially true at RSA. Prior to the conference, Reuters reported that the RSA organizer was engaged by the NSA and was responsible for creating loopholes for the agency. As a result, several digital security experts declined to attend and speak at RSA. In opposition to this movement, Stephen Colbert, who gave the closing remarks, called Snowden, “practically a war criminal,” and encouraged the American people to take responsibility for their actions:

    "We all deserve credit for this new surveillance state that we live in," he said, "Because we the people voted for the Patriot Act. Democrats and Republicans alike. We voted for the people who voted for it, and then voted for the people who reauthorized it, then voted for the people who re-re-authorized it."

  • Corporate firewalls with authentication services from the past created the notion of corporate security as an island fortress. The more remote the island, the more secure the company. Today, the prevalence of BYOD has created several bridges to that island, and the workforce is eager to make use of these bridges. At RSA, we saw that IT admins are less inclined to manage multiple security vendors and systems.

  • Along this same thread, enforcing security policies in the cloud was also heavily discussed at RSA. Overall, companies were looking for a mix of private, hybrid and public cloud services, whereby some applications remain stored in corporate data centers and others housed in a public cloud.

  • The many security breaches that occurred in 2013 sparked the discussion about which team – admins or hackers – is winning the security match. The several billions being spent on IT security didn’t prevent severe attacks on Target, Neiman Marcus and Snapchat, to name a few, and thousands of people suffered as their personal data was exposed.

  • In order to combat malicious hackers, we saw a trend toward the application of big data to IT security. The use of massive amounts of data could enable the early detection and removal of security breaches.

Which IT security trends did you discover at RSA 2014? Let us know in the comments!

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